/2017/02/wsj_lightning_usbc_rumor

Comments

toolshed:
Lighting is better. There is zero chance of giving to USB-C. (I can see a higher voltage mode for lightning, but only for battery quick charge, though Apple would only do that if they could guarantee minimal battery damage (quickcharge is horrible on batteries)).
1:00 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
toolshed:
*Lightning is better.
1:01 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
To Be Fair:
>The iPhone 7 and 7 Plus already have no physical home button.

That's not true.
2:25 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
Fuck iPhone. Fuck Cook. I won't buy another iPhone until Cook is fired or leaves.
4:38 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
The freshness of a new design is particularly important in China? Oh for fuck's safe. Have you met a human being?

The 'report' is a jumbled mess. But if even half true, it confirms what we already know: Tim Cook hasn't a clue and needs to go.
5:23 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
chas_m:
The iPhone 7 did very well in China ... against state-sponsored and approved competition (and currency headwinds). Apple's still breaking records with it -- not bad for a recycled design ...

Personally I think Apple's doing quite well under, Cook -- Steve's hand-picked successor -- because Cook has the talent to manage a Fortune 50 company. Steve never did -- but he had a great plan to turn Apple INTO a Fortune 50 company.

As a Mac owner, I certainly wish that the company paid more attention to "me" on that front, but let's face facts:
iPhone: 75M units
iPad: ~11 million units
Mac: ~ 5.5 million units

The Mac gets exactly the amount of attention its sales warrant (actually more than its sales warrant). If you want Apple to pay more attention to the Mac line, get your Windows friends to switch. The Mac will get plenty of attention when Apple is selling 10-20M units a quarter of them.
5:52 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
don't care about sales; the iphone 6 and 7 are badly designed.
6:59 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
>>The iPhone 7 and 7 Plus already have no physical home button.

>That's not true.

ummm... have you seen an iphone 7? it, in fact, has no physical home button. it has an indentation, that doesn't move. that's not a button.
7:24 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
It's a button.
7:59 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
ano:
> The Mac gets exactly the amount of attention its sales warrant

Mac revenue is larger than iPad and growing while iPad is shrinking.
8:51 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
To Be Fair:
>ummm... have you seen an iphone 7? it, in fact, has no physical home button. it has an indentation, that doesn't move. that's not a button.

How is an indentation, with sensors under it, not a "physical" button? It also has a "taptic" engine to provide *physical* force feedback when pressed.

What about it isn't physical?
9:58 am — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
Patrick Henry, the 2nd:
> It's a button.

Its a shitty button then. I hate the new iPhone 7 "button". It blows.
4:12 pm — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
it has no moving parts, which is the usual agreed upon meaning of 'button' when you're talking about switches. stop being intentionally obtuse.
4:37 pm — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
Moving parts are not what defines a button. Nor does a button need to have a physical element to be considered a button.

There are all sorts of buttons represented in GUI's all over the place.

Take any browser for example and you have radio buttons, back button, refresh button, home button, etc.

Buttons are what they are and that is what we call them. Buttons.
5:27 pm — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
elbowroom:
@anonymous, To Be Fair


> How is an indentation, with sensors under it, not a "physical" button? It also has a "taptic" engine to provide physical force feedback when pressed.

> Nor does a button need to have a physical element to be considered a button.

In this case the original article is discussing a "physical button", and thus in the context of the discussion it's absolutely mandatory. Usually "physical button" refers to something that moves with a hinge or another mechanical contraption. The "button" in the iPhone 7 doesn't do anything in terms of physical movements. It's the whole bottom part of the iPhone 7 that vibrates. The button is just a sensor area.

I suspect there's a disconnect between the writer and Gruber's semantics. The writer probably wanted to say there's no dedicated "push button area" in the hardware anymore in the fashion of the traditional iOS home button.
10:11 pm — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
To Be Fair:
>The "button" in the iPhone 7 doesn't do anything in terms of physical movements.

That's not true. Movement is how you feel the vibrations from the "taptic engine" when you press it. Movement is how it senses you pressing it.

>It's the whole bottom part of the iPhone 7 that vibrates. The button is just a sensor area.

And that's a *physical* area built into the hardware, not an arbitrary "virtual" button that only exists on an LCD display. There's actual button-specific hardware there.
11:07 pm — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
To Be Fair:
@anonymous:

>it has no moving parts,

Bullshit. How do you feel the "click" if it has no moving parts?
11:08 pm — Wednesday, 1 March 2017
anonymous:
i'll explain this slowly so you can understand it. wait, no i won't, i'll let apple do it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WK0txAWUVHg

the same thing applies to the iphone 7 home button.
3:57 am — Thursday, 2 March 2017
To Be Fair:
>i'll explain this slowly so you can understand it. wait, no i won't, i'll let apple do it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WK0txAWUVHg

I'm not sure what your point is. That video clearly shows how the "taptic engine" is a physical, mechanical system that both senses and generates physical movewments.
5:27 am — Thursday, 2 March 2017
anonymous:
yes, and they're completely separate systems. but keep fucking that chicken.
5:39 am — Thursday, 2 March 2017
anonymous:
>yes, and they're completely separate systems.

Huh? So the taptic engine has nothing to do with the "click" you feel when you press the home button?
6:33 pm — Thursday, 2 March 2017
elbowroom:
@To Be Fair

> That's not true. Movement is how you feel the vibrations from the "taptic engine" when you press it. Movement is how it senses you pressing it.

No it doesn't. The whole bottom part of the iPhone vibrates. The "button" is just a sensor area.
1:09 am — Friday, 3 March 2017
anonymous:
>No it doesn't. The whole bottom part of the iPhone vibrates. The "button" is just a sensor area.

So, movement *is* how you feel vibrations from the taptic engine?

That doesn't contradict my claim that it is physical and mechanical.
2:21 am — Friday, 3 March 2017
To Be Fair:
Also, if the button is "just a sensor area" then it obviously is physical in order to sense the presses.
2:23 am — Friday, 3 March 2017
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