/linked/2017/04/14/nintendo-nes-classic

Comments

To Be Fair:
I was wondering who was stupid enough to want to buy these things. Now I have my answer.
2:20 am — Sunday, 16 April 2017
Vanilla Dry Ice:
So it makes sense when Apple kills popular products (various iPod models over the years), but if any other company does it it's inexplicable.

Got it.

Go fuck yourself, Gruber.
2:45 am — Sunday, 16 April 2017
Off The Verge:
We have paid close attention to consumer feedback, and decided to ignore it.
4:15 am — Sunday, 16 April 2017
anonymous:
>So it makes sense when Apple kills popular products (various iPod models over the years), but if any other company does it it's inexplicable.

Not really the same. In Apple's case they would have something to replace it with. (Nano replacing Mini).
7:01 pm — Sunday, 16 April 2017
Q*Bert:
> So it makes sense when Apple kills popular products (various iPod models over the years), but if any other company does it it's inexplicable.

I agree with anonymous. Bad analogy. Also I don't recall Apple end-of-lifing products that the vast majority of people never even had an opportunity to buy. iPods were around for many years before they got killed.
7:55 pm — Sunday, 16 April 2017
Ailurus:
I think Nintendo is following Disney's 'vault' model of maintaining demand through limiting supply. It's clearly worked well for the Mouse in terms of physical media, and perhaps Nintendo doesn't want the entirety of the planet actually playing 'Super Mario' again and losing their nostalgia goggles all at once?

As for the sentiment-
Jesus, Gruber are you that desperate to play 'Balloon Fight'? Ever heard of an emulator?
3:20 am — Monday, 17 April 2017
Gruber the Booger:
^^^

I also agree. The ipod was around for a fairly long time in one form or another.

But once people could buy iphones with other carriers and it simply exploded in numbers, the ipod indeed faded away at an accelerated rate for the most part.

Apple hasn't been without it flops though. G4 Cube anybody?

But even the G4 Cube sort of evolved into the Mac Mini.

Perhaps Apple abandoning or drastically changing software crucial to someones workflow would be a better example?
3:24 am — Monday, 17 April 2017
No Comments for You:
You think Nintendo makes computers, but really they make toys. This is totally in line with the toy business.
4:13 am — Monday, 17 April 2017
not a toy thing:
I'd guess availability of the NES was adversely affecting sales of the Wii U/Switch/whatever. The question is where you get your Nintendo fix. If you can get it solely from buying an NES, you're likely not a participant in Nintendo's future revenue stream, where you rent Mario interaction, forever.

This is capitalism at its finest. Huzzah!
5:28 am — Monday, 17 April 2017
Gruber the Booger:
>I'd guess availability of the NES was adversely affecting sales of the Wii U/Switch/whatever

Please show me where you can find a brand new Switch for its MSRP. They are all sold out. Show where that little NES which is sold-out stole sales from the Switch, which is sold out.

>The question is where you get your Nintendo fix.

No. It can be more than one thing. Nintendo folks can also be PC or table top gamers for example.

The answer is Nintendo made what turned out to be a couple of hits with conservative production.

That little NES struck a nostalgia nerve with wannabe hipsters (Gruber) and people who actually like some of the games.

The new Zelda is a clearly a system seller with more copies sold than Switch consoles sold.

Do you understand that?

People have bought a copy of Zelda hoping they can get their hands on a sold-out Switch soon.

Even a company like Apple can't keep up with production sometimes. Let alone Nintendo.

>This is capitalism at its finest.

No this is capitalism running less than optimal for The Corporation and the consumer. Ideally production by The Corporation would match consumer demand in order to maximize profit for The Corporation and MSRP availability for the consumer.

If The Corporation doesn't match consumer demand things like price gouging by black markets or third party sellers abound. These sorts of outcomes do not benefit The Corporation or the consumer.
5:55 am — Monday, 17 April 2017
Marcel:
NES Classic was a holiday stop gap measure, and a marketing/brand/nostalgia boost in preparation for the Switch release. It's done what it needed to do. Want to play those games? When VC titles are announced again, Nintendo want you to buy a Switch.
1:29 am — Saturday, 22 April 2017
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